Murder by the Sea: Steven Grieveson

This first series of Murder by the Sea has featured several men who started killing at a young age, including Stephen Akinmurele and Mathew Hardman. The series finishes with another – Steven Grieveson.

He became known as the Sunderland Strangler. The case is distressing because his four victims were also young. Thomas Kelly was 18, David Hanson and David Grieff both 15, and Simon Martin was 14.

Grieveson had a chaotic and abusive upbringing, some of it in care. His murders showed elements of abuse as well as violence towards his victims.

It is curious that the Sunderland Strangler case is not better known

He carried out his crimes between 1990 and 1994. It was a while before the police realised they had a serial killer on their hands.

Murder by the Sea David Holmes

Dr David Holmes

In tomorrow night’s final report, criminal psychologist Dr David Holmes says, ‘It is curious why Grieveson’s case was not more in the public eye. Perhaps this is one of those cases where something was tucked away on the coast, out of sight and out of mind.’

Well, Murder by the Sea puts that right. It gives an insight into this sad and horrendous series of killings – and how the murderer was caught.

CBS Reality: Monday 25 June 10pm; Tuesday 26 June 2am; Sunday 1 July 9pm

Murder by the Sea: Paul Longworth

Paul Longworth

Paul Longworth thought he had committed the perfect crime.

He strangled his wife, Tina, with a rope and left her dangling from the banisters. He then left the scene of the crime, their home. He went to Southport Sailing Club, where he was the commodore, to celebrate his 37th birthday party.

Back at home, he left his two young children asleep in their beds, while their dead mother was downstairs. No one at the party suspected he had just committed murder.

CBS Reality

On returning home, he called the police, alerted his neighbours to the death and told everyone Tina had committed suicide. At first detectives believed him.

As former detective – and role model for Prime Suspect‘s Jane Tennison – Jackie Malton says during the next edition of Murder by the Sea, ‘What makes this crime particularly unpleasant and horrific is that he risked that his two children could have got out of bed and found their mother, which would have traumatised them.’

The series, on CBS Reality, has so far dealt with psychopaths and gangsters. This episode is different. It explores a story of domestic abuse, about the darkness behind respectability and the cold-bloodedness of this killer.

Thought he was cleverer than the police

Like the other talking heads on this episode, I found it hard to work out how somebody, even a man in a failing marriage, could have had such a void of feelings inside.

I was filmed in a Cardiff boatyard for Murder by the Sea

‘He came across as very much an arrogant man, says Professor Mike Berry. ‘He thought he was cleverer than the police, he thought he was going to get away with it.’

To find out why he didn’t, watch Murder by the Sea on CBS Reality (Monday 18 June 10pm, Tuesday 19 June 2am, Sunday 24 June 9pm).

And for an insight into how devastating Longworth’s crime was, see this interview with his grown-up daughter in the Daily Mirror.

Murder by the Sea: Mathew Hardman

Mathew Hardman’s murder of his 90-year-old neighbour on Anglesey in 2001 was extremely disturbing.

Why? Because, as presenter Geoffrey Wansell says in tonight’s Murder by the Sea, it was so ‘unfathomable’. Hardman, aged 17, was an art student who had delivered newspapers to Mabel Leyshon, who lived up the road from him.

Hardman, of course, had his reasons, unfathomable as they are to us. He had become obsessed with vampires and latched onto the elderly pensioner to be his victim.

An ‘unheard of’ crime

He stabbed her 22 times and cut out her heart. He then drank her blood. Be warned, it is a horrific story and certainly one detectives found perplexing.

This is the second of the cases in this series that I was invited to appear on. Having studied this grim, depressing crime, I still found Hardman’s state of mind off-limits to my comprehension.

On the programme, however, there are some insights from the likes of clinical forensic psychologist Professor Mike Berry. ‘If I was faced with this case of a 90-year-old woman being stabbed 22 times, I would not have been looking for a fantasist who was into vampires,’ he says.

‘I would probably have thought more of either robbery or some sexual behaviour. Seventeen-year-olds don’t normally kill old people. They’re more likely to kill someone their own age and it’s likely to be impulsive or sexually based, that kind of stuff.

‘To kill somebody because you want their blood is extremely rare. For a 17-year-old, it’s unheard of. That made it difficult for the police.’ Continue reading